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8 months ago • Sean

I'm typically not the type of person to set goals simply because the calendar turns over to a new year, but this time I wanted to jot down a few woodworking goals that I'm going to try and stick to for 2018. Here are a few:

  • Stop rushing to get a project done. This is probably my number one goal for 2018. I started the whole "content creation" mindset to grow my social media profiles to then help grow this site. Well that's not working and I think it's ruining my love for the hobby. In 2018, I'm going to try and slow this down to where i'm possibly only going to work on the weekend and if it takes me 3 months to get a project done, that's fine.
  • Learn everything I can about veneering/vacuum press/bent lamination. I'm not completely new to veneering, but i've only scratched the surface. I understand how much a woodworker can benefit from diving in to the world of veneering and using tools like the vacuum press. The vacuum press is so versatile. If you watch people like Guys Woodshop on Instagram, you see he uses his vacuum press for things like bent lamination, gluing up leg blanks for workbenches (which means you don't have to fight with clamps) and much more.
  • More design work. One issue with trying to complete the projects for social media (YouTube and Instagram) is you really don't want to spend the time to use software like Google Sketchup to design a piece that's complex. Now, a basic table is simple, but adding curves and crazy joinery really slow me down so I avoided them. I hope to change that.
  • Become one with my hand tools. I'm not a complete stranger when it comes to using hand tools, but I know for a fact that I can use them in a much more efficient way and that all starts with sharpening. I currently use the Lee Valley honing guide, and even though it works, I'm not happy with it. The bevel is always skewed but it left me with a "sharp" chisel/blade so I ignored it. The setup time to use the jig is also a pain in the ass, but I get around that by not sharpening as often as I should. I hope to change that by learning how to free-hand sharpen. I know it's going to be tough, but practice makes perfect.

That's all I can think of right now, but that's enough to keep me busy for an entire year. What about you, did you set any goals for 2018? Let me know below.

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2 months ago • Sean

I had a chance to finally integrate sliding doors in my latest project and I gotta say, I can see me using them again in the near future. It's a great alternative to fiddling with hinges.

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10 months ago • Clock_Man

I'm in the midst of a shop remodel and I'm moving from a cabinet to wall layout for my tools. I'm debating on what tools I should keep readily available and those that will eventually go down below my workbench in the drawers. 

Anyone have some decent tips on what's worked for them?

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10 months ago • DonnyCarter

What finish do you guys use? I've always used Mahoneys walnut oil on my bowls and have started using it on my cutting boards. I don't like the typical mineral oil because it never dries. Thoughts? 

4 comments
10 months ago • Sean

I've used them since I started woodworking but recently started to notice that when I use them on places like legs or table tops where theres an edge, the finish doesn't seem to dry as fast as the rest of the surface. Think i'm using bad tack cloths? Which brand do you use?

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10 months ago • nesportsman

I didn't take too many pictures throughout the process, but this gives you the basic steps required and some gotchas.

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10 months ago • Sean

Hey guys, the 2017 Holiday Gift Contest is now underway so get to submitting your projects! We already have several projects that have been submitted! If you have any questions, please post them here and I will answer them.

Thanks again to Acme Tools, Bosch Tools and Rockler Woodworking for sponsoring this contest!